Elementary

Junior High

High School

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Course Descriptions 2019-2020

LANGUAGE ARTS

Language Arts Graduation Requirements

  • Four credits required
  • One credit each year (Grades 9-12)
  • No substitutions

Language Arts Course Descriptions

LANGUAGE ARTS

English 10

  • Full year class

Students will read and discuss a variety of fiction and non-fiction texts with the emphasis in World Literature and will write in a variety of formats: including narrative, expository, and argumentative. Other study will emphasize speaking/listening and language/usage skills.

 

English 10 Honors

  • Full year class

This accelerated and challenging class will include an in-depth focus on reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language. Specifically, students will analyze a variety of literature and non-fiction texts with the emphasis of World Literature and will become proficient in narrative, expository, and argumentative writing.

 

English 11

  • Full year class

This class provides further practice in both oral and written expression. Students will review ACT-related language skills and read and write expository, narrative, and argumentative pieces while reviewing usage skills. Analytical and critical thinking are practiced while surveying American Literature, providing opportunity for exploration of the philosophies that have shaped America.

 

English 11 Honors

  • Full year class

Concentrating on American Literature, this class is an accelerated, intensive, advanced course for juniors. Students will review ACT-related language skills and write, examine and use the fundamental skills involved in the writing of scholarly papers with a focus on expository, narrative, and argumentative pieces.

 

AP English Language

  • Full year class

  • English 11 Credit

Students completing the AP Language course will be prepared to take the AP English Language exam. The course is designed for accelerated juniors and seniors who wish to work for college credit. Coursework includes analytical writing skills, in-depth study of classical literature and non-fiction, and extensive preparation for the AP Language exam.

 

English 12

  • Full year class

This course emphasizes consolidation of literacy, creative and critical thinking, and communication skills. Students will read and analyze a range of challenging fiction and informational texts, write personal and expository essays, practice speech and presentation skills, and apply key concepts to analyze media works.

 

AP English Literature

  • Full year class

  • English 12 Credit

Students completing the AP English Literature course will be prepared to take the AP English Literature exam. The course is designed for accelerated seniors who wish to work for college credit. Coursework includes analytical writing skills, in-depth study of classical literature, fiction, and non-fiction, and extensive preparation for the AP Literature exam.

 

AP English Literature/Language

  • Full year class

  • English 12 Credit

Students completing the AP 12 English Literature and Language courses will be prepared to take the AP English Literature and AP English Language exams. The course is designed for accelerated seniors who wish to work for college credit. Coursework includes analytical writing skills, in-depth study of classical literature, fiction, and non-fiction, and extensive preparation for the two English exams.

 

CE English 1010- Introduction to College Writing

  • Semester

  • English 12 Credit

  • ACT Score Prerequisite

  • Concurrent enrollment fees required

This course will teach students to find, evaluate, and understand sources while emphasizing that sources exist as part of an ongoing conversation. This course is divided into three related sections: reading and summarizing professional texts, synthesizing the information learned, and producing two formal literature reviews.

 

CE English 2010- Intermediate College Writing

  • Semester

  • English 12 Credit

  • ACT Score Prerequisite

  • Concurrent enrollment fees required

This course builds upon skills developed in CE English 1010. The overarching goal is for students to participate in intellectual communities by reading, synthesizing, and responding to professional texts. Students will create two argumentative essays, one synthesis and response, and three smaller essays of choice. Students must have an ACT score of 29 in English and 29 in Reading OR have completed CE English 1010 with a C or higher.

 

CE English 2200- Introduction to Literature

  • Semester

  • English 12 Credit

  • ACT Score Prerequisite

  • Concurrent enrollment fees required

This class is intended to provide you with some of the fundamentals of critical reading and interpretation by looking at a series of, mostly, English and American poems, short stories, novels, and plays. You will be exposed to an impressive array of well and lesser known writers.

 

Humanities English 12

  • Semester

  • English 12 Credit or Elective Credit

During this semester-long senior English class, this course will focus on the question, “What makes us human?”  Through reading, writing, speaking and viewing/listening, students will investigate how Music, Theater, Literature, History, Art, Dance, and Religion/Philosophy enhance human experience.  Using a “hands-on” approach, students will (virtually) visit the great museums of the world, listen to music masterpieces, and watch great theater/film while exploring our collective humanity. While all senior students are welcome, this class may appeal most to students involved in the visual and performing arts.

 

Creative Writing

  • Semester

  • English 12 Credit or Elective Credit

This course introduces beginning writers to elements of effective writing while studying the basic ingredients of good stories, poems, and prose.

 

Creative Writing 2

  • Semester

  • English 12 Credit or Elective Credit

This course is for students who have completed Creative Writing I and wish to continue to improve their craft in an advanced setting with peers dedicated to writing. Students will refine their skills as they explore descriptive, narrative, fictional, and poetic modes of writing.

 

Journalism 1

  • Semester

  • English 12 Credit or Elective Credit

Students will study the basic principles of print, social media, and online journalism as they examine the role of printed news media in our society. They learn investigative skills, responsible reporting, and journalistic writing techniques as they read, respond to, and write their own news and feature articles. Students will participate in creating their own stories about the happenings of the school and community and publish their works on the Davis High News website.

 

CE Communications 2110- Interpersonal and Small Group Communications

  • Semester

  • English 12 Credit

  • GPA Prerequisite

  • Concurrent enrollment fees required

This course focuses on interpersonal and small group communication. The class requires a small group component and a required eight-hour service-learning group project. This interactive and Canvas-centered class includes active discussions and addresses critical life and workplace skills. CE Communications fulfills 3 semester hours of Humanities for General Education requirement at WSU.

 

LANGUAGE ARTS ELECTIVES

Audio Visual Team- DTV

Language Arts Electives

 

Audio Visual Team-DTV

Full Year Class

 

DTV is a student-run club producing weekly news broadcasts played during homeroom class. This is a hands-on course focusing on collaboration and project management. Students produce news stories during class, including writing scripts and interview questions, story planning, timeline management, and video production and editing. This course is open to all students at any level, and although it is not required, it is helpful if you have experience with digital media, and is beneficial to students looking for a career in broadcast journalism.

Yearbook

Yearbook

Full Year Class

Application Required

Yearbook  teaches how to create an entire yearbook from beginning to end. You will learn everything from layout design, photography, journalism, time management, and how to record a history. It is a great way to be involved in the school, without a lot of out-of-school hours. It requires dedication and determination but is also a lot of fun and produces a product that most of the student body purchases.

MATHEMATICS

Mathematics Graduation Requirements

  • Three credits required
  • Students must complete Secondary Math 1 and Secondary Math 2
  • There are many options for the third year of math
  • Not all third year math options fulfill the requirements for the Regents scholarship or NCAA eligibility
  • Math Lab is elective credit; it does not count towards math credit

Mathematics Course Descriptions

MATHEMATICS

Secondary Math 2

  • Full year class

  • Required course for those students who have successfully completed Secondary Math I (Grades of C and above). DESK standards and content taught in this class are on the district website. Students will be required to have a graphing calculator. Rentals are available. (Texas Instrument TI-83 or TI-84 strongly recommended.)

 

Secondary Math 2 Honors

  • Full year class

  • Specifically, for those students who have completed Secondary Math I Honors. This course will help prepare students for Secondary III Honors and then AP Calculus. DESK standards and content taught in this class can be found on the district website. Students will be required to have a graphing calculator. Rentals are available.  (Texas Instrument TI-83 or TI-84 strongly recommended.)

 

Secondary Math 3

  • Full year class

  • This course is for students who have successfully completed Secondary Math II (Grades of C and above). This course will lead students to CE Math 1010, 1030 or 1050. DESK standards and content taught in this class can be found on the district website. Students will be required to have a graphing calculator. Rentals are available.  (Texas Instrument TI-83 or TI-84 strongly recommended.)

 

Secondary Math 3 Honors

  • Full year class

  • Specifically, for those students who have successfully completed Secondary Math II Honors. This course will help prepare students for AP Calculus. DESK standards and content taught in this class can be found on the district website. Students will be required to have a graphing calculator.  Rentals are available.  (Texas Instrument TI-83 or TI-84 strongly recommended.)

 

College Prep Math

  • Full year class

  • Third year math option after Secondary Math III

  • This course is designed as an option for students who have not yet qualified for Math 1010 or 1030, but are planning to attend college after graduation.  Concepts are focused on topics covered on the ACT and building skills to help students be able to qualify for 1010 or 1030 when they enter college the next fall.

 

Math for Life

  • Semester class or full year class

  • Third year math option instead of Secondary Math III.

  • This course is for students who have completed Secondary Math II but are not prepared for Secondary Math III. (Grades below C).  It will introduce students to topics in mathematics as they are applied to real-world situations. This course is intended to help students develop an understanding of how mathematics describes and explains the world in which they live.

 

Accounting 1

  • Semester class

  • Third year math option

  • This class will fulfill the 3rd year of math credit needed for graduation. This class is for students who prefer not to take Secondary Math III, or who have had Secondary Math II and need an additional math credit for graduation.

  • You will gain an understanding of how a business operates and how to keep track of the money the business earns and spends. You will use the computer to create business records doing double-entry accounting to manage the money for a small, one-owner service business. You will be analyzing daily business transactions, tracking earnings and expenses, calculating profit or loss, and managing a business checking account. You will have the skills to help you get a great part-time job as an accounting clerk. Students can earn a state skills certificate upon successful completion of state competencies.

  • Students taking both Accounting 1 & Accounting 2 can receive a 3rd year math credit. Membership in FBLA is encouraged.

Accounting 2

  • Semester class

  • Third year math option

  • Prerequisite Accounting 1

  • In Accounting 2, you will review and expand on the skills you gained in Accounting 1. You will manage the financial records for a merchandising corporation. You will create and maintain payroll records for employees; use the computer to journalize transactions for purchasing and selling merchandise, adjustments, depreciation, and uncollectible accounts. You will also be able to analyze corporate financial statements. You will be well prepared for entry-level accounting clerk positions, and you can earn a state skills certificate upon successful completion of state competencies.

  • Students taking both Accounting 1 & Accounting 2 can receive a 3rd year math credit. Membership in FBLA is encouraged.

AP Statistics

  • Full year class

  • Students will be exposed to major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students will explore data, plan a study, anticipate patterns, provide statistical inferences, and explore theoretical probability in this course. Students will be required to have a graphing calculator.  Rentals are available.  (Texas Instrument TI-83 or TI-84 strongly recommended.)

     

 

CE Math 1010

  • Semester class

  • ACT Score or GPA Prerequisite

  • Concurrent enrollment fees required

  • Students must have at least a C average grade in Secondary Math I, II, and III or an ACT math score of at least 21 to be eligible to register for the course. This class prepares students to take MATH 1050. Students who take Math 1010 after taking Math III will not meet the requirements for the Utah Regents Scholarship without also taking Math 1050.

 

CE Math 1030: Quantitative Reasoning

  • Semester class

  • ACT Score or GPA Prerequisite

  • Concurrent enrollment fees required

  • CE 1030 is a college math course offered by Weber State University. Students earn quantitative literacy (GE math) credit with successful completion of the course (at final grade of a C or better with at least a 65% weighted average on WSU’s midterm and final exams). Students must have at least a C average grade in Secondary Math I, II, and III or an ACT math score of at least 21 to be eligible to register for the course. Course topics include set theory, counting and probability, modeling with math, financial math and statistics.  

 

CE Math 1050: College Alegrabra

  • Semester class

  • ACT Score and GPA Prerequisite

  • Concurrent enrollment fees required

  • CE 1050 is a college algebra course offered by Weber State University. Students earn quantitative analysis (GE math) credit with successful completion of the course (at least a C grade). Students must have at least a C average grade in Secondary Math I, II and III and a qualifying test score, at least a 23 ACT math score or at least a 60 Accuplacer test score, by January to be eligible to register for the course from WSU. Students will take a comprehensive midterm and final test written and corrected by WSU. Graphing calculators are not allowed by WSU. Students may use a scientific calculator.

 

AP Calculus AB

  • Full year class

  • Full year calculus lab required in addition to the class

  • This college course is a requirement for a degree in the exact sciences, medicine, law, economics, business, etc. The four topics covered in this course are derivatives, limits, indefinite and definite integrals and their applications. (Passing the AP exam fulfills the math competency requirements for college graduation. TI-84 graphing calculators are required for this course. Enrollment in AB Lab is required concurrently, and you will automatically be enrolled for two class periods.)

 

AP Calculus BC

  • Full year class

  • Full year calculus lab required in addition to the class

  • Calculus BC includes all topics covered in Calculus AB plus additional topics. This class is equivalent to two semesters of College Calculus and is designed to qualify you for placement and credit in a course that is one course beyond what is granted for Calculus AB. (Passing the AP exam fulfills the math competency requirements for college graduation. TI-84 graphing calculators are required for this course. Enrollment in the calculus BC Lab is required concurrently and you will automatically be enrolled for two class periods.)

 

Corequisite Calculus Lab AB or BC

  • Full year class

  • Taken in conjunction with AP Calculus

SCIENCE

Science Graduation Requirements

Three (3.0) credits of Science is required from the following areas:

  • Two Foundation Sciences (2.0) credits required
    • Foundation Sciences include:
      • Earth Systems
      • Biology
      • Physics
      • Chemistry
      • Environmental Science
  • One Third Year Science or another Foundation Science Requited (1.0 credit)

Foundation Science Courses

Foundation Science Courses

 

Biology

Full Year

This course is intended to give students a solid background in fundamental and current topics in Biology. This course will focus on the organization of life at the chemical and cellular levels, genetics, evolution, plants and animals, the relationships of living things and their environment.

 

AP Biology

Full Year

The AP Biology course is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course usually taken by biology majors during their first year. Areas of study will include biochemistry, cellular biology, genetics, evolution and the interaction of living organism in their environment.

 

Chemistry

Full Year

This is an introductory course that studies atoms, their structure, and interactions. Applications of chemistry to real life will be presented throughout the year. Concepts presented in class will be reinforced through laboratory work.

 

Chemistry-Flex

Semester

Flex Chemistry allows students to work at a self-paced rate and earn one full year of Chemistry credit in one semester. Students will be provided with instruction through canvas. Class time will be spent completing assignments, labs and exams. Students will complete the same assignments and labs as a traditional year-long Chemistry course. 

 

CE Chemistry 1110

Full Year

Concurrent enrollment fees required

This purpose of this course is to introduce general and some organic chemistry to students in nursing, engineering technology, and some other fields of science and health professions who will take no more than one year of chemistry. Chemistry 1110 includes general, organic, and biochemistry. This course entails 4 hours of lecture/discussion and one 3-hour lab a week. This course satisfies the Physical Science General Education learning outcomes.

 

AP Chemistry

Full Year

This is a college level course designed to prepare students to successfully pass the AP test. Students will learn many theoretical concepts that will prepare them for further studies in chemistry and the medical profession and science related fields. Students will be doing advanced placement labs with TI calculators, probes and computers. This is a hands on college level course.

 

Physics

This algebra-based course will cover topics such as motion, force, energy, waves, sound, light, optics, electricity and magnetism. Methods include discussions, demonstrations, assignments, hands-on lab activities and projects such as bridge building, mini-car racing and water balloon launchers.

Recommended Math: Secondary Math I with a C or better each term.

 

Physics-Flex

Semester

Flex Physics allows students to work at a quicker pace and earning one full year of credit in one semester. Students will be provided with instruction through canvas and allowed to submit assignments for automatic grading. Students will have the ability to use online resources with the assistance of an instructor and a full physics lab. Main topics covered in the course include: motion, forces, waves, electricity, magnetism, momentum, and energy. Math will be incorporated almost daily in the understanding of the physics concepts. Recommended Math: Secondary Math I with a C or better each term.

 

CE Physics

Not approved for the Regents Scholarship

Junior and Senior

Full Year

Concurrent enrollment fees required

 A brief survey of physics at the introductory level. Topics covered include laws of motion, gravity, energy, light, heat, sound, electricity, magnetism, atomic and nuclear physics, radioactivity, and relativity. Three hours of lecture per week

 

AP Physics 1: Algebra Based

Full Year

This course is an introductory algebra-based college level physics course that explores the concepts of motion such as Newtonian mechanics; work, energy, power; waves and sound; and introduces simple circuits. 

 

AP Physics C: Mechanics

Full Year

This calculus-based course covers Newtonian mechanics in some detail. Methods include discussions, demonstrations, assignments, hands-on lab activities and optional projects. This is a college level course designed to prepare students to successfully pass the AP test.

 

AP Physics C: Electricity (taken with AP Physics C: Mechanics)

Semester

This course will discuss electricity with an emphasis on Calculus. This course is taken concurrently with AP Physics C

Third Year Science Options

Third Year Science Options

Astronomy

Full Year

Junior and Senior 

A full-year class that explores the boundaries of space, and how we as humans explore and observe space from our viewpoint on Earth. Many of the activities are technology/online based, often in-class or occasionally at home; regular access to the internet beyond class-time (mainly for Canvas) is required. Topics addressed include: measuring and tracking objects in the night sky; the history of astronomy; the formation of the Earth, Moon, and Sun; the composition and characteristics of the planets and moons, and the exploration of our solar system; formation and evolution of stars and galaxies (yes, including black holes); and cosmology which includes the study of the origin of the universe.

 

Biotechnology

Full Year

Biotechnology is a lab based course where students learn the basics of cells, chemicals, pipettes, DNA and Proteins, grow bacteria, extract DNA from different types of cells, analyze DNA using gel electrophoresis, multiply DNA with Polymerase Chain Reaction, send off their own DNA to be sequenced, add glowing green protein to bacteria, learn about Human Genome Project and DNA engineering. Students can earn a Medical Innovations Pathway Diploma, do an internship their senior year with Biotech companies in Utah, and earn $14 per hour out of high school with a certificate of completion in CTE. (1.0 high school credits) No prerequisites.

 

Zoology

Semester

The course introduces zoology.  Zoology is a course that will survey the nine major phyla of the kingdom Animalia.  Zoology is the study of animal life.  Zoologists research everything they think to ask about animals, including their anatomy and interrelationships, their physiology and genetics and their distributions and habitats. 

 

 

Environmental Science- Chemistry

Semester

Exploring the chemistry of the Great Salt Lake

This is a one-semester, project-based class where students study the GSL environment to determine recommendations for protecting and improving it by studying the chemistry of the water and soil around it. A field trip to the GSL will take place during the semester to collect samples and analyze them in the laboratory. The class will develop critical thinking skills, collaboration skills and inspire stewardship of our local environment. Some outside work may be required (service hours), but most class time will be dedicated to working on assigned projects. Each team submits a report at the conclusion of the class which determines the grade received.

Link to Westminster College resources for more information: https://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/gsl/

 

Introduction to Organic Chemistry

Semester

Introduction to Organic Chemistry is a semester-long course for students that are interested in pursuing a career in medicine (nursing, pre-med, etc) or in chemical engineering.  Students will be graded on assignments, exams, and hands-on laboratory experiments. Students will be introduced to several topics including: Alkane, alkyl halide, alkyne, alcohol and ether naming and reactions. Infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Required class: AP/Honors Chemistry or General Chemistry upon instructor recommendation.

 

Medical Anatomy and Physiology

1.0 Science Credit and 1.0 CTE Credit

Concurrent enrollment fees required

CE-Weber State University: HTHS 1101, 1120

Those seeking and wondering if they are seeking a health profession will want to take Medical Anatomy and Physiology.  This course will offer 5 CE (College credits), Medical Terminology and Case Studies.  It is a pre requisite for those wishing to take Advanced Medical Anatomy and Physiology (General ed. College credit).  We explore health careers, learn how the body functions and what happens when things go wrong.  For Juniors/Seniors. Double block (daily 1 class period all year). Suggested prerequisite Introduction to Health Science.

 

Advanced Anatomy and Physiology (Integrated Anatomy and Physiology I & II)

1.0 Science Credit and 1.0 CTE Credit

CE-Weber State University:  HTHS 1110, 1111)

Concurrent enrollment fees required

An Anatomy and Physiology course designed for senior students interested in a Medical or Health Science profession.  It provides a detailed study of Anatomy and Physiology, Biochemistry, and Pathophysiology.  This course is the prerequisite Anatomy and Physiology course for Weber State University’s Allied Health programs.

CE- 8 Weber State University credits. Seniors Only. Double Block (daily 1 class period all year). Prerequisite: Medical Anatomy & Physiology (MAP)

 

Introduction to Engineering

Full Year

CE Option

Have you ever had an idea that you thought might make you rich? If you only knew how to design your idea you might be able to change the world. This “hands-on” course was developed by engineers as a way for students to understand how to understand the design process of invention. Students will use 3-D design programs to solve problems. There is well defined formula for success in taking ideas from your mind and making solutions available to the world. We investigate this design cycle in detail. This course introduces students the various engineering tools that turn brilliant ideas into cash and career. Among other things, students will experience simple sketching technique, 3-D computer design, product development, prototype construction, product efficiency. Students learn how to use modern engineering tools, techniques, and technology to solve problems that benefit humankind.

 

Principles of Engineering

Full Year

CE Option

This “hands-on” course answers the question: “What is engineering” The course was developed by engineers to help students become aware of the exciting world of engineering. This course introduces students the various engineering tools that turn brilliant ideas into cash and career. Students will experience sketching, computer design, product development, machine construction, robot building and programming, projectile launching and many other valuable engineering concepts. Students learn how engineers use math, science, and technology to solve problems that benefit humankind.

 

Engineering Design and Development

Full Year

 

Aquaculture

Full Year

The study of freshwater fish.

 

Animal Science

Full Year

This course exposes students to a wide range of scientific principles such as genetics, anatomy, physiology, nutrition, diseases, reproduction, behavior, and management practices of all kinds of animals. Career opportunities and educational preparation are also examined. The students will have many hands-on activities that will help them relate what they have learned to the real world.

 

Animal Science II

Full Year

Students will be exposed to more in-depth management practices associated with livestock management, breeding and genetics, and the importance of anatomy and physiology in animal management practices.

 

Plant and Soil Science

Full Year

SOCIAL STUDIES

Social Studies Graduation Requirements

  • Two and a half (2.5) credits of Social Studies is required from the following areas:
    • A semester (.5) of Geography. Typically a 9th grade (Freshman class).
    • A full year (1.0) of World History. Typically a 10th grade (Sophomore) class.
    • A full year (1.0) of United States History. Typically an 11th grade (Junior) class.

Social Studies Course Descriptions (Required Classes)

SOCIAL STUDIES

 

Geography

  • Freshman

  • Semester

  • Not offered at the high school

World History

  • Sophomores

  • Full year class

  • This class is required of all sophomores to complete their graduation requirements. This course stresses the diverse economic, political, religious, and social systems throughout world civilizations, e.g. Middle Easterners, Africans, Eastern Europeans, Russians and Latin Americans. AP World History will also satisfy this requirement.

AP World History

  • Sophomores, Juniors, Seniors

  • Full year class

  • AP exam fee

  • This college level course will prepare students to take the AP World History exam. AP World History studies the history of World Civilizations, the development of world nation state systems with cultural, economic, and philosophical developments included. Students taking this course should be committed to the academic rigor associated with AP Courses, as well as taking the AP exam at the end of the year. This course will fulfill the World History high school graduation requirement. College credits available based upon achievement on the AP test.

U.S. History II (High School U.S. History)

  • Juniors

  • Full year class

  • United States History II addresses the making of modern America, highlighting the events and issues in United States history from the late Industrial Revolution to modern times. Topics include, but are not limited to, the Industrial Revolution, the Progressive movement, imperialism and foreign affairs, the World Wars, the Great Depression, the Cold War, the civil rights movements, the rise of terrorism, and modern social and political history. Students will be graded based on core standards and skills.

AP U.S. History

  • Juniors and Seniors

  • Full year class

  • AP exam fee

  • This course is a comprehensive study of political, social, economic, and diplomatic development in America from the 1400’s to the 1980’s. It is designed to test knowledge-based analytical skills. Students taking this course should be committed to the academic rigor associated with an AP Course, as well as taking the AP exam at the end of the year. This course will fulfill the US History high school graduation requirement. College credits available based upon achievement on the AP test.

Social Studies Electives

SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES

Psychology

Semester class

This is a semester course designed to provide an insight into the complexities of human behavior and the process of the mind. Topics include, but are not limited to, theories of psychology as a science, learning, memory, and other topics with some direction and selection by the students. Emphasis is placed upon improvement of communication skills, an understanding of the processes of human behavior, and mental process.

 

Sports Psychology (CE option available)

Semester Class

If CE option is chosen- Concurrent Enrollment fees are required.

This is a semester course designed to explore the mental, psychological and physiological factors that affect athletic, personal and professional performance. The concepts discussed in class can be directly applied to any sports/activity but more importantly the skills discussed will help you in your daily life. The curriculum covered includes (but not limited to) Mental Toughness, coping with anxiety and stress, motivation, visualization and imagery, relaxation, goal setting, positive attitude and self-talk, how to achieve your optimal level, in addition to discussing leadership and social skills. Critical thinking and an open mind are essentials for this class.

 

AP Psychology

Full year class

AP exam fee

This college level course will prepare students to take the AP Psychology exam. Study includes topics in such areas as research methods, the biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, development, consciousness, motivation, emotion, memory, thought, intelligence, social psychology, personality, abnormal psychology and therapy. In addition to providing students with a working knowledge of psychological theories, important concepts, and significant researchers, instruction will emphasize critical thinking, problem solving, and writing skills. College credit available based upon achievement on the AP test.

 

Sociology

Semester class

This semester course is designed to foster life-long learning in exploring and understand the link between societal issues, human attitudes, ethics, values and behaviors based in groups, rather than just the individual. Without realizing it your life is directly and indirectly related to the field of sociology. Topics covered (but not limited to) crime & deviance, teen issues (friends, dating relationships, peer pressure and others), gender roles, media and popular culture. Developing your own sociological perceptive is the primary objective of this class.

 

Current Issues

Semester class

 

History of World Religions

Semester class

This course is a survey of the major belief systems in human history.  We discuss how various belief systems influenced the development of civilization and culture and continue to do so in today's world.  We will read excerpts from the sacred texts of many world religions.

 

History Elective-History of Film

Semester class

 

CE Criminal Justice

Semester class

Juniors and Seniors

CE fees

 

AP Economics (Macro- and Micro-)

Full year class

AP exam fee(s)

AP Economics is a college level introductory course in the social science of both Macroeconomics (the study of the economy as a whole) and Microeconomics (individual markets and decision makers in the economy). You will gain a thorough understanding of the effect consumers, business, the government, and foreign trade and investment have on our economy and standard of living, as well as the economic factors that affect individual firms and business. You will be a better-informed citizen for having taken this class and gain a much greater understanding of the world around you! Any student planning any sort of career related to any kind of business would particularly benefit from this course. Two AP exams (Microeconomics and Macroeconomics) can be taken at the completion of this course.

 

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND CITIZENSHIP

U.S. Government and Citizenship Requirements

  • .50 credits of U.S. Government and Citizenship is required for graduation
  • Students must also pass the high school U.S. Citizenship test for graduation

U.S. Government and Citizenship Courses

U.S. Government and Citizenship

 

 

U.S. Government and Citizenship

Seniors

Semester class

The goal of this course is to foster informed and responsible participation in federal, state, and local government. Student will be able to explain and analyze major ideas, protections, privileges, structures, and economic systems pertaining to American citizens. AP US Government & Politics or CE Us Government will also satisfy this requirement. Must pass US Citizenship Test.

 

American Government/Law

Juniors and Seniors

Semester class

American Government and Law is a semester course which fills the U.S. Government and Citizenship credit requirement for graduation. The law class covers much of the same material as U.S. Government class but with an emphasis on law, legal studies, and the American Judicial System. The course introduces topics normally studied in the first year of law school.  

 

AP U.S. Government and Politics

Semester class

This class is the equivalent to a one semester college course in United States Government. Regular reading and preparation is essential to success in this course. Students read and analyze documents and data and perform written tasks as a means of mastering the subject. As a result, students gain an understanding of the foundations of U.S. Government, political beliefs, the role of parties and interest groups, the institutions of the national government, public policy, and civil rights and civil liberties. Students are strongly encouraged to take the AP United States Government and Politics exam in May. Students are encouraged to continue their government studies by taking the AP Comparative Government and Politics course which is offered 2nd semester only.

College credit is available based upon achievement on the AP test.

 

AP Comparative Government and Politics

Semester class

This class is the equivalent to a one semester college course in comparative political systems. Regular reading and preparation is essential to success in this course. Students read and analyze documents and data and perform written tasks as a mean of mastering the subject. As a result, students gain an understanding of the origins, beliefs, divisions, role of citizens, framework, and forces of change in political systems throughout the world. The countries studied in this course are China, Great Britain, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria and Russia. Students are encouraged to take the AP Comparative Government and Politics exam in May. It is strongly suggested that students have completed AP United States Government and Politics before taking this course. College credit is available based upon achievement on the AP test.

FINE ARTS

Fine Arts Graduation Requirements

  • One and a half (1.5) credits of Fine Arts are required for graduation
  • Students must pick from the selections listed below.

Visual Arts Course Descriptions

VISUAL ARTS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

Painting 1

  • Fine Art Credit

  • (10-12) Semester

  • Fee $20.00

  • Prerequisite: None

 

This is an excellent course where students develop fun painting techniques using a variety of mediums. Students can paint on a variety of surfaces and learn how to mix and blend colors beautifully. Students learn how to use a variety of brushes and implements to capture a variety of different textures.

 

Painting 2 (Advanced)

  • Fine Art Credit

  • (10-12) Semester

  • Fee $20.00

  • Prerequisite: Painting I

 

Student must have taken a DHS painting class prior to taking this course. Students will continue to develop painting techniques using a variety of mediums and surfaces. Students will expand on skills learned in Painting I, including mixing and blending color, as well as creating texture. Students are encouraged to create original art.

 

Art Foundations

  • Fine Art Credit

  • (10-12) Semester

  • Fee $20.00

  • Prerequisite: None

 

This is a fun course where students develop a wide range of art techniques, with an emphasis on fundamentals. Students will explore a wide variety of artistic mediums and surfaces, including charcoal, colored pencil, paint, 3-D sculpture, collage, and print-making. Students are encouraged to create original art.

 

Drawing 1

  • Fine Art Credit

  • (10-12) Semester

  • Fee $15.00 per semester

Drawing 1 is an introductory class. No experience is necessary! It is a semester class which will cover the following:

  • Learning to draw what the eye sees. This makes our drawings look real.

  • Drawing and shading to create the illusion of form (3-D)

  • Gaining skill in various media which may include, pencil, scratchboard, pastels, charcoal and colored pencil.

  • Learning the basics of linear perspective.

 

Drawing 2

  • Fine Art Credit

  • (10-12) Semester

  • Fee $15.00 per semester

  • Prerequisite: Drawing 1

Drawing 2 will build on the skills learned in Drawing 1. You will continue to build your observational skills and become more competent in various media. You will also focus on creating artistic drawings that exhibit creativity, beautiful mark making and good design principles.

 

Studio Art for the Non-Art Major ART 1030 CE Weber State University

  • College credits: (3)

  • (11-12) Semester

  • Fee $20.00 per semester

A general education course for non-art majors that primarily includes a series of hands-on art experiences (such as drawing and sculpture). Class discussion draws from the disciplines of art history, art criticism, and aesthetics as guides through visual presentations. For students desiring to broaden their academic background in the area of visual literacy and problem solving.

 

Ceramics 1 

  • Fine Art Credit

  • (11-12) Semester 

  • Fee $20.00

Course content and projects instruct students in creative process and thoughtful design with one of the most exciting artistic mediums: kiln fired clay. Students learn basic skills of wheel-thrown and hand-built ceramics in this one semester studio art course. Students develop a beginning portfolio of several completed ceramics projects. 

 

Ceramics 2 and 3

  • Fine Art Credit

  • (11-12) Semester each

  • Fee $20.00 semester

  • Prerequisite: take Ceramics 1, 2 & 3 in order.     

Students continue studio art experience in clay and sculpture with wheel-thrown and hand-built ceramics projects. Basic skills are enhanced with continued studio practice. Students are encouraged to develop projects particular to individual interests. Intermediate level 3D art portfolios may be developed.

 

Jewelry 1 and 2

  • Fine Art Credit

  • (10-12) Semester

  • Fee $20.00 each Semester

Prerequisite: Jewelry 1 required before taking Jewelry 2

Jewelry Design allows students the opportunity to combine art education with small metals. Techniques include silver soldering, metal forming, lost wax casting and glass fusing. Jewelry 1 and 2 are one semester each.

 

AP Art History and Criticism

  • Fine Art Credit

  • (10-12) Year

The Advanced Placement offering in the History of Art is designed to provide the same benefits to secondary students as those provided by an introductory college course in Art History. Other benefits include an understanding and enjoyment of architecture, sculpture, painting and other art forms within historical and cultural contexts.

Students receive advanced placement credit by passing the AP exam at the end of the year. No prior experience in the history of art is assumed for those students who take the course. The course does require a high degree of commitment to academic work and to the purposes of the program designed to meet college standards.

 

Art History and Criticism- Women’s Studies

Semester

 

This course explores the work of women artists, as well as representations of women throughout history, with an emphasis on the modern period. Issue of gender are examined in relation to the subject matter, stylistic preference, media, reception and criticism of female artists. Issues to be discussed include self-representations by women artists; themes of motherhood; the impact of the women’s movement on art; issue of the gaze and the gendering of vision; and the various obstacles and options facing the contemporary women artist. Painters, sculptors, and photographers to be examined included Artemisia Gentelleschi, Frida Kahlo, Berthe Morisot, Eva Hesse, Georgia O’Keefe, Cindy Sherman, Judy Chicago, Merritt Oppenheim, and Hannah Hoch. Discussions also focus on major works created during the Renaissance, Impressionist, and Modern periods.

 

Art Foundations 2 Advanced –

  • Fine Art Credit

  • (11-12) Semester (may take multiple semesters )

  • Fee $20.00 per semester

  • Recommended: Successful completion of two of the following 2D art classes: Drawing 1, Drawing 2, watercolor painting, acrylic painting, Art Foundations 2, or permission of the instructor.

  • Although listed as a semester course for registration, students may take as many sections as they would like.

This class is designed for advanced art students who have accepted the challenge of a rigorous artistic curriculum and are interested in

  • Developing a portfolio with the objective of applying for post high school art scholarships and being prepared for university level art major and minor programs, or

  • Developing advanced art skills for personal goals and enjoyment.  

 

The class will focus on producing creative and original works of art that exhibit effective use of the principles of design and skill in using various media. Students are allowed more freedom in choosing subjects and media than other classes. However, it will also require more initiative and decision-making ability.  The class requires most students to do significant and regular work outside of class. All work must be original as prescribed by AP guidelines.

 

Students interested in completing and submitting an AP Studio Art Portfolio with the aim of getting general education and elective college credit, should enroll in this class. Most students need 3-4 semesters combined of Art Foundations 2 Honors and AP Studio Art to complete the AP portfolio.

 

 

AP Studio Art – 2D Design/Drawing

  • (11-12) Semester (may take multiple semesters )

  • Fee $20.00 per semester

  • Recommended: Students should be enrolled in Art Foundations 2 Advanced to be considered. AP classes are integrated into the Advanced. Their registration will be changed to AP Studio Art during the year they submit their AP portfolio. Although listed as a semester class for registration, students are encouraged to take as many sections as they can. Most students need 3-4 semesters of Art Foundations Honors and AP Studio art to complete the AP portfolio.

 Once enrolled, students will work with the instructor to develop a production schedule and meet those deadlines as they work toward the completion and submission of either the AP Studio Art Drawing or AP Studio Art - 2D Design Portfolio. Each will focus on creating original artwork that exhibits creativity, proficient mark making and/or superior design principles. All work must be original as prescribed by AP guidelines.

 

Dance Course Descriptions

Orchestra Course Descriptions

Band Course Descriptions

Vocal Music Course Descriptions

Drama Course Descriptions

Drama

 

Audio Visual Team-Stage Crew

Year

An introduction to the behind-the-scenes elements of a theater production developed through theory and stage crew experiences. Subjects covered may include scenery construction and painting, drafting, sound, digital electronics, stage management, production organization, theatrical lighting, prop construction, and the development of related crafts in the theatre.

CTE

CTE Graduation Requirements

One (1.0) credit of CTE is required for graduation

  • Students must pick from the selections listed below:

Family and Consumer Science Course Descriptions

Health Science

HEALTH SCIENCE DEPARTMENT COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

Introduction to Health Science (.5 credit Health/.5 credit CTE or elective)

This one-year course allows students to experience and become familiar with all health-related professions, medical terminology, and to make educated decisions about future career paths. The study of body system anatomy, diseases and disorders. Hands on lab opportunities and activities. Entry level for sophomores in the Health Science Pathway. Health credit and CTE credit earned.

 

Medical Anatomy and Physiology (1.0 Science Credit and 1.0 CTE Credit)

CE-Weber State University: HTHS 1101, 1120

Those seeking and wondering if they are seeking a health profession will want to take Medical Anatomy and Physiology.  This course will offer 5 CE (College credits), Medical Terminology and Case Studies.  It is a pre requisite for those wishing to take Advanced Medical Anatomy and Physiology (General ed. College credit).  We explore health careers, learn how the body functions and what happens when things go wrong.  For Juniors/Seniors. Double block (daily 1 class period all year). Suggested prerequisite Introduction to Health Science.

 

Certified Nurse Assistant Course Description (1.0 high school credit)

This semester course teaches and prepares you to take the CNA State Exam.  If you pass both the written and the skills portion of the test you will become a Certified Nursing Assistant.  This means that you get to work under the license of a Licensed Practical Nurse or Registered Nurse in the following settings: Long-Term Care facilities, Assisted Living centers, Rehabilitation centers, home-health and hospice agencies, and Hospitals.  You will get to work with a variety of patients and residents.  

Double block. Semester only.  Requirements:  16 years old on the First day of Class 

 

Sports Medicine/Exercise Science Course Description (1.0 credits)

CE-Weber State University: AT2175 (3.0 CE credits)

This one-year course is designed to teach students components of Sports Medicine/Exercise Science including exploration of therapeutic careers, medical terminology, anatomy/physiology, first aid, injury prevention and rehabilitation techniques, modalities, sport nutrition, sport psychology, and performance enhancement philosophies. CPR certification from American Red Cross.  CE Credit (3.0) Junior/Senior

 

EMR- Emergency Medical Responder Course Description (0.5 high school credits)

CE-Weber State University:  AT 2300.  Emergency Medical Response (3 CE credits)

Learn to care for people in an emergency as a first responder including patient assessments, CPR, bandaging, splinting, and backboarding. Course leads to American Red Cross certification in Emergency Medical Response (EMR) and includes 3 additional certificates: CPR for the Professional Rescuer, administering oxygen, and blood borne pathogens. Perfect lead up to being an EMT.

CE credit (3.0) Semester course. Junior/Senior

 

Biotechnology (1.0 credits)

Biotechnology is a lab based course where students learn the basics of cells, chemicals, pipettes, DNA and Proteins, grow bacteria, extract DNA from different types of cells, analyze DNA using gel electrophoresis, multiply DNA with Polymerase Chain Reaction, send off their own DNA to be sequenced, add glowing green protein to bacteria, learn about Human Genome Project and DNA engineering. Students can earn a Medical Innovations Pathway Diploma, do an internship their senior year with Biotech companies in Utah, and earn $14 per hour out of high school with a certificate of completion in CTE. (1.0 high school credits) No prerequisites.

 

Advanced Anatomy and Physiology (Integrated Anatomy and Physiology I & II)

CE-Weber State University:  HTHS 1110, 1111)

(1.0 Science high school Credit and 1.0 CTE Credit)

An Anatomy and Physiology course designed for senior students interested in a Medical or Health Science profession.  It provides a detailed study of Anatomy and Physiology, Biochemistry, and Pathophysiology.  This course is the prerequisite Anatomy and Physiology course for Weber State University’s Allied Health programs.

CE- 8 Weber State University credits. Seniors Only. Double Block (daily 1 class period all year). Prerequisite: Medical Anatomy & Physiology (MAP)

Digital Studies and Information Technology

Technology and Engineering

Agricultural

Business and Marketing

Graphics and Digital Media

Automotive

Woodworking

Work Based Learning (Internships)

Flight School

DEBATE

Debate

Debate

 

Debate 1

Full Year

Students will not only be introduced to and participate in a variety of speaking activities which will be designed to increase argumentative and persuasive skills, but they will prepare to engage in competitive speech and debate. Tournament attendance will be required. Students will learn informative and persuasive speaking skills as well as methods of Lincoln-Douglas, legislative and parliamentary debate.

Required attendance: four tournaments

 

 

Debate 2 and 3

Semester or Year

This course is designed for those who have completed Debate 1.  Students should expect to polish and refine their speech and debate skills through class work and interscholastic competition.  The following competitive speaking events will be developed:  debate, student congress, original oratory, interpretation of literature, extemporaneous and impromptu speaking.  Emphasis will be placed on developing research, analytical, persuasive, and argumentative skills.

Prerequisites: Debate 1 and/or Instructor Approval

Required attendance: eight tournaments.

 

WORLD LANGUAGES

French

French

French 1

Full Year

Students will discover the French language and increase proficiency in reading, writing, speaking and listening skills.  Students will also have the opportunity to practice the language in a range of contexts likely to be encountered in the French speaking culture.  Students use simple sentences and phrases accurately and respond to questions.  Novice Mid Proficiency Level (words, phrases & sentences)

 

French 2

Full Year

CE Option

CE Fees

 Students will discover the French language and increase proficiency in reading, writing, speaking and listening skills.  Students will also have the opportunity to practice the language in a range of contexts likely to be encountered in the French speaking culture.  Students use more complex sentences and phrases accurately within a wider range of vocabulary. Students respond to questions and gather information by asking questions.  Novice High Proficiency Level (strings of sentences & paragraphs)

 

French 3

Full Year

CE Option

CE Fees

Students will discover the French language and increase proficiency in reading, writing, speaking and listening skills.  Students will also have the opportunity to practice the language in a range of contexts likely to be encountered in the French speaking culture.  Students create language by breaking apart and recombining sophisticated chunks of vocabulary. Students create questions to sustain and maintain the flow of a conversation.  Intermediate Low Proficiency Level (paragraphs & essays)

 

French 4 (CE Option), French 5, AP French

Full Year

Students will discover the French language and increase proficiency in reading, writing, speaking and listening skills.  Students will also have the opportunity to practice the language in a range of contexts likely to be encountered in the French speaking culture.  Students create more complex sentences and can write more complex paragraphs with ideas flowing from sentence to sentence.

 

CE French Bridge 3117

Full Year

CE Fees

Students will discover and explore La Francophonie through the prism of important themes including but not limited to the arts, history, commerce, technology, sports, etc. Students will engage these themes through a variety of approaches such as project-based instruction, class discussion, and reaction papers.